Equal parts nature and culture, Puerto Rico is a diverse cruise stop with offerings for all


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Framed by rainforest and sea, Puerto Rico’s Bahia Beach is a hidden gem of a public golf course.
One of the Caribbean’s largest islands, Puerto Rico is an extremely popular stop for cruise ships. And while it’s a frequent port of call, the island boasts a vast diversity of natural and cultural offerings that is capable of entertaining cruisers for multiple days or repeat visits.

In the City
The large city of San Juan is quite modernized and frequently glamorous, with resorts and casinos serving as a big draw for visitors. The colonial area of the city, however, is the real treat, with the San Felippe del Morro and San Cristobel forts, more than 400 preserved buildings, the stunning San Juan Cathedral, and hidden historical treasures around nearly every corner. Rum lovers can also visit the Bacardi Rum Factory in San Juan, the world’s largest rum distillery, for guided tours.

Out in Nature
Puerto Rico’s bountiful coastline plays host to popular beaches such as Gilligan’s Island and Luquillo Beach, although there’s more to do in the island’s great outdoors than just lounging in the sand. Three bioluminescent bays offer the once-in-a-lifetime travel experience of swimming in glowing waters lit by thousands of single-celled organisms. Alternately, the El Yunque rainforest is a popular day trip among visitors, while Camuy River Cave Park is home to a stunning system of underground rivers with sinkholes and caverns aplenty for adventurers.

Memorable Meals
The town of Loiza offers food with an African influence, while Caribbean-fusion can be enjoyed in Luquillo. In San Juan, the SoFo district is a great area for hip dining. A few dishes worth seeking out around the island include empanadillas (turnovers stuffed with meat or seafood), tostones (fried green plantains), mofongo (mashed plantains with meat or seafood), lechon asado (roasted suckling pig), and bacalaitos (salted cod fritters).