A volcanic archipelago in the Pacific is the perfect destination for a relaxing escape to nature and also has a place in history. Charles Darwin first visited the Galapagos Islands in 1835 and developed his first ideas of the theory of evolution on these grounds. Today, you can take a cruise around the beautiful waters and discover nature at its best with a wildlife viewing tour. Whether you’re a planning a romantic getaway or a family vacation, here are our top three picks for cruises to the Galapagos Islands:

Endemic Luxury Catamaran Cruise

Set sail on a small ship cruise adventure on board the Endemic, a new 16-passenger luxury catamaran that offers spacious cabins and modern comforts. The ship is designed with a sky lounge, bar and Jacuzzi so you can enjoy the journey as well as the destination. Shore excursions include snorkeling, kayaking, and hiking with a guide.

Silverseas Baltra to San Cristobal Cruise

Head off on a 7-day cruise through the north-central region of Galapagos to see the wildlife up close and take a separate boating adventure to explore the lava tunnels of the region. The voyage takes place on the Silver Galapagos that features two dining options — outdoor patio dining at The Grill with grills made with volcanic rock, and The Restaurant with its open-seat dining room. A dedicated snorkeling area on the ship with snorkeling equipment will give you a chance to enjoy the waters for some underwater exploring. The ship is also home to a library featuring a selection of hardcover books, magazines, and newspapers to enjoy at your leisure.

Avalon Waterways Ecuador & Its Galapagos Islands Cruise

Head off on a 12-day adventure from Quito, the “Center of the World” where you can start with a sightseeing adventure and visit to an Ecuadorian chocolate factory before heading off on your voyage with a trip to the Charles Darwin Research Station. This trip takes you to the Ecuadorian Amazon and includes a 4-night cruise on the Treasure of Galapagos ship. You’ll have the chance to go snorkeling to discover the tropical waters and see dozens of species that Darwin documented almost two centuries ago.